Ubuntublox Housing – We Are One

During my career, I have been drawn to heretics such as Harvey Lacey, a retired welder from Wylie TX who wanted to help people in developing nations build their own homes out of plastic trash. Flashback to the Ubuntublox housing concept in 2012, a concept that could be a reality if we could get companies to stand behind building sustainable housing that would in turn help clean up our planet and give people jobs. We could use these homes now in a big way for developing nations and even our own country. The clip attached shows how Harvey’s Ubuntublox house could withstand a 7.0-8.0 magnitude earthquake. He built his first house in Haiti, a place where people are more scared of their homes than earthquakes. We need more believers like Harvey and individuals who fight for the well-being of those who are less fortunate. The one-pound building blocks are made from plastic trash and tied together by welder’s string. They dance together as one during the earthquake...

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Empathy-Based Marketing Comes Down To Your Purpose

At one time, consumers were a captive audience. You sold it, they bought it, as long as it was a prestige brand, a household name, or was promoted by an influencer or by a really cool cartoon animal. Times have changed and to stand out, you not only need to have a quality product or service, but you also need to show that you understand your audience—not even stellar content curation and content promotion can save you if your marketing isn’t hyper-targeted. This is where purpose comes in. You need to ask yourself, what is your purpose behind promoting your product, brand, or initiative? Enter empathy-based marketing. What is empathy-based marketing? Empathy-based marketing is a strategy that calls for you to walk in your customer’s shoes for a bit. Instead of using a hard-sell approach, you consider their experience and think about how your brand can help them get what they want, which could be: More free timeMore happinessMore friendsBetter healthA more attractive appearanceA career advantage Yes, you’re still out to make a profit, but with empathy-based marketing, your strategy is different. You need to connect with your audience on a deeper and more intuitive level by delivering an immense value that they never anticipated. In short, make them feel like you read their mind before going above and beyond. Define your customer A lot of businesses use buyer personas to direct their marketing. These personas are fictional characters that represent your ideal customers. Without them, your marketing efforts can be a bit like throwing snowballs in the dark and hoping that you blindly connect with something. To be effective, your personas need to take customer emotions into account. Identify their wants and pain points, understand how these factors make them feel, and then plan your content accordingly. For example, customers who are constantly rushed for time will want a simplified usage guide while those who are buying to indulge themselves value things that make them feel extra-special, like a free gift with purchase. Understand your customer Who are you marketing to? Is it busy parents? Small business owners? People who are passionate about the environment will pay attention. To communicate properly with them, you need to understand what they care about and how your product can give them what they want, whether it be more free time, a healthier body, or a new skill that they can use to climb the corporate ladder. Send a message that resonates Empathetic content shows customers that you understand what it’s like to walk in their shoes. People feel positive about brands that can solve their problem, so send a message, using the right words, that shows how your products address issues that matter to them. Conclusion Although...

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“Aspirational Consumers” Seek Corporate Change

  Despite profound economic, political and social challenges around the world, a rising generation of “aspirational consumers” is optimistic about the future and sees brands and free market capitalism as a force for positive change, according to a new global study by brand consultancy BBMG and stakeholder intelligence firm GlobeScan. The report, “Five Human Aspirations and the Future of Brands,” says “aspirationals” are more likely than any other consumer segment to “believe the world is going in the right direction” (49 percent versus 40 percent global public), and that “our children and grandchildren will have a higher quality of life than we do today” (56 percent versus 48 percent). This sense of optimism includes a belief in their power to influence corporate behavior, with nearly eight-in-ten aspirationals saying, “as a consumer, I can make a difference in how a company behaves” (78 percent versus 68 percent).  Aspirationals are defined by an innate sense of optimism and a belief that everyday actions when joined with the actions of their peers can make a positive difference in the world. The report finds that more than twice as many aspirational consumers want to improve free market capitalism rather than replace it, with 55 percent of aspirationals saying that “free market capitalism has some problems, but these can be addressed through regulation and reform” (51 percent global public), compared to 22 percent who believe that “free market capitalism is fatally flawed, and a different economic system is needed” (22 percent Global Public). Just one-in-ten aspirationals (13 percent) say “free market capitalism works well and efforts to increase regulation will make it much less efficient” (13 percent Global Public). Similarly, aspirationals match the general public in believing that companies should be  responsible for creating positive impact by “ensuring products are safe and healthy” (74 percent), “providing fair wages to all employees” (72 percent),“not harming the environment” (70 percent), “ensuring a responsible supply chain” (69 percent) and “treating employees fairly” (66 percent). Aspirationals are more likely than the global public in their expectation that companies should “support charities and community projects” (60 percent Aspirationals to 57 percent Global Public), “reduce human rights abuses” (56 percent to 54 percent), “help reduce the rich-poor gap”. Aspirational expect brands to lead with their values and meet higher standards for health, safety, fairness and social impact in ways that drive progress for people and positive impact for the world. With the Aspirationals, brand leaders now have an opportunity to leverage sustainability and social purpose to drive relevance, relationships, loyalty and business growth.        ...

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Help GiveLove Expand Worldwide

Patricia Arquette and Rosetta Getty founded GiveLove in 2010 in hopes of helping displaced families have shelter over their heads as soon as possible.  In the past five years the Cause has evolved with the needs of the country.     Eco sanitation, clean water, and access to toilets is what the group has been focussing on over the past few years with a lot of determination, heart, and hard work to get the funding needed to keep the largest eco sanitaton in the world running.   The Cause is now ready to help other countries and started a crowd funding campaign a few days ago.  The cool thing about this campaign is that a person who donates the minimum amount of $10 has the chance just like those who donate more to go abroad with Patricia and team to see how GiveLove works.   The Cause has worked with a lean team on a very tight budget over the years and continues to do its best to educate the world how dire the issue of poor sanitation is in our world.  As Patricia explains in the video below, “Poor sanitation and waterborne illnesses kill more kids than AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined.” HERE IS HOW YOU CAN HELP SUCH AN IMPORTANT CAUSE   ShareGiveLove Needs Your Help To Expand Worldwide   And here is how you can help donate to a Cause that is truly fighting a major epidemic that a lot of people do not seem to be able to wrap their heads around.   Imagine that 40% of the population does not have access to a toilet while 60% of the population has access to cell phones.   Something seems obviously wrong here.  ...

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